Scientist Warns Solar Storm Could “Wipe Out the Internet” for Weeks or Months
2023/11/14

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The sun, though seemingly calm from our viewpoint on Earth, is actually a raging inferno of activity. With its sunspots and occasional outbursts of plasma, known as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), it can wreak havoc on our planet's delicate infrastructure. The danger lies particularly in the potential destruction of electronics, which are not only fragile but also costly to replace.

Professor Peter Becker of George Mason University recently spoke about the risks posed by increased solar activity and our society's growing dependence on the internet. He explained that the internet has flourished during a period of relative solar calm, but now we are entering a more active phase. This juxtaposition of heightened solar activity and our reliance on the internet is unprecedented in human history.

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Solar flares, which are bursts of radiation emitted by the sun, serve as a warning sign of an impending CME. These CMEs can travel in random directions through space, but scientists can predict when they are heading towards Earth, providing us with roughly 18 to 24 hours of warning. However, even with this warning, the impact on our electronics can be devastating.

Professor Becker cautioned that the solar activity can affect electronics that we believe to be safe. He explained that in events like these, inductive currents can be driven into the Earth's surface, leading to unexpected damage. Even devices that are properly grounded may not be immune to the destructive power of a CME.

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To illustrate the potential consequences, Professor Becker referenced a similar event in 1859 when telegraph wires and operators suffered greatly. Sparks flew off the telegraph lines, operators were electrocuted, and high voltage coursed through the wires. The strong magnetic field variations acted as a generator system, overpowering the telegraph system. Now, with our delicate internet infrastructure, the damage could be far more severe and long-lasting.

The potential downtime for repairs of infrastructure such as electronic switches and communication systems could reach several weeks to months. The economic disruption caused by such an event would be significant, affecting not only communications but various industries as well.

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Despite the alarming scenario, Professor Becker emphasized that proactive steps can be taken to mitigate the damage. The key is paying attention and responding promptly to advance warnings. Satellites can be put into safe mode, and transformers can be taken offline to prevent frying. Additionally, there is a need for long-term strategies to harden the internet infrastructure, although the cost and feasibility of such measures pose economic challenges.

While the sun's activity poses a formidable threat to our technological society, being prepared and taking preventive actions can significantly reduce the potential damage. As we enter this period of increased solar activity, it is crucial that we prioritize the safeguarding of our electronic systems, ensuring we are not caught off guard by the sun's fiery outbursts.

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